Healthcare Analytics Summit 2014 Healthcare Analytics Summit 2014

Keynote Sessions

Educational Breakout Sessions

Outcomes Improvement Case Study Sessions

Analytics Walkabout Sessions

Pre-Summit Client Sessions

Ed Catmull

Co-founder of Pixar, President of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios

Jim Collins

Best Selling Author including Built to Last, Good to Great, and Great By Choice

Daryl Morey

Houston Rockets’ General Manager, Managing Director of Basketball Operations

Amir Dan Rubin

President and Chief Executive Officer, Stanford Health Care

Timothy G. Ferris, MD, MPH

Senior Vice President for Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare

Timothy Sielaff, MD, PhD, FACS

Chief Medical Officer, Allina Health

Dan Burton

Chief Executive Officer, Health Catalyst

Brent Dover

President, Health Catalyst

Caleb Stowell

Vice-President Research and Development, International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM), Senior Researcher, Harvard Business School

Charles Macias, MD, MPH

Chief Clinical Systems Integration Officer, Texas Children’s Hospital

M. Bridget Duffy, MD

Chief Medical Officer, Vocera Communications, Inc., Former Chief Experience Officer, Cleveland Clinic

Vi Shaffer

Research Vice President, Global Industry Services Director, Healthcare Providers, Gartner

Frederick C. Ryckman, MD

Professor of Surgery/Pediatric Surgery, Sr. Vice President, Medical Operations, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Christopher S. Russi, DO, FACEP

Chair - Division of Community Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic

Sreekanth Chaguturu, MD

Vice President for Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare

Gregory A Spencer, MD

Chief Medical & Chief Medical Information Officer, Crystal Run Healthcare

Gene Thomas

Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Memorial Hospital Gulfport

Christopher Kodama, MD, MBA, FAAP

President, MultiCare Connected Care

Jonathan E. Gottlieb, MD

Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Executive, Indiana University Health

James J. Dearing, DO, FACOFP, FAAFP

Vice President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Medical Officer, Accountable Care Organization, Honor Health

Samuel L. Volchenboum, MS, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Director, Informatics Program, The University of Chicago Medicine

Greg Stock

Chief Executive Officer, Thibodaux Regional Medical Center

Mark Mullarkey

Senior Vice President, Texas Children's Hospital, President, Texas Children’s Physician Group

David Bertoch

Vice President, Comparative Data and Informatics, Children’s Hospital Association

Eugene Kolker, PhD

Chief Data Officer, Seattle Children's Hospital

Jay T. Bishoff, MD, FACS

Director, Intermountain Urological Institute, Intermountain Healthcare

Terri Brown, MSN, RN, CPN

Assistant Director, Clinical Outcomes & Data Support; Research Specialist, Center for Research and EBP, Texas Children’s Hospital

Kathleen Carberry, R.N., M.P.H.

Director, Outcomes and Impact Service, Texas Children’s Hospital

Brian Carlson

Director of Health Care Intelligence, Allina Health

Louis G. Cervone, Jr.

Director of Business Intelligence, Crystal Run Healthcare

Helen Chan

Senior Manager, Business Planning, Partners Healthcare

Samir Courdy, BS, MBA

Chief Research Information Officer, Director of Research Informatics at the Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah

J. Kevin Croston, MD, FACS

Chief Executive Officer, North Memorial Health Care

Myra Davis

Sr. Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Texas Children's Hospital

Wes Elfman

Visualization Developer, Clinical and Business Analytics, Stanford Health Care

Jay Fakier, MD

Radiologist, Thibodaux Regional Medical Center

Linda Fehr, RN

Division Director, Supportive Care, OSF HealthCare

David A. Fenstermacher, Ph.D.

Chief Research Information Officer, Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Virginia Commonwealth University

Roopa Foulger

Executive Director, Data Delivery, OSF Healthcare

Chris Harper

Director of Business Architecture and Analytics, University of Kansas Medical Center

Mark F. Hebert, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Surgical Specialist, Thibodaux Regional Medical Center

John Henderson

Assistant Vice President, Texas Children’s Hospital

Mark Hohulin

Senior Vice President, Healthcare Analytics, OSF Healthcare System

Stephanie Jackson, MD

Chief Medical Officer – Hospitals, Vice President, Quality, HonorHealth

Spencer H. Kubo, MD

Chief Medical Officer of BioControl Medical, United Heart & Vascular Clinic, Allina Integrated Medical Network

David B. Larson, MD, MBA

Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology), Stanford University Medical Center

Stephanie Lenzner, MSHA, MBA

Vice President, Enterprise Performance Management, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

Sasha Madison

Director Infection Prevention and Control, Stanford Health Care

Christi McCarren, RN, MBA, CPHQ

Vice President, Retail Health & Service Lines, Multicare Health System

John A. Merenich MD, FACP, FNLA

Medical Director, CO Kaiser Permanente Clinical Informatics and Decision Support

Jake Mickelsen

Lean Six Sigma-Black Belt, Quality Improvement Education Manager, Department of Radiology, Stanford University

Paul Monier, MD, F.A.C.S.

Infectious Disease Specialist, Thibodaux Regional Medical Center

Susan Chapman Moss, M.P.H.

Vice President, Business Planning and Market Development, Partners HealthCare

Kate Mundell MBA, PMP

Program Manager, Clinical Collaboratives, MultiCare Health System

Shawn Murphy, MD, PhD

Medical Director of Research Computing and Informatics, Partners HealthCare

Jonathan F. Nasser, MD

Chief Clinical Transformation Officer, Crystal Run Healthcare

Mike Noke

IS Associate Director, Enterprise Data Warehouse, Partners HealthCare

Rich Pollack, MS CHCIO, FHIMSS

Vice President and Chief Information Officer, VCU Health System

Joseph Pollman

Executive Director, Business Knowledge Management, Community Health Network

Dr. Robert Sawicki, MD

Senior Vice President, Supportive Care, OSF Healthcare

Christopher D Spahr, MD

Chief Quality Officer, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

Ensor E. Transfeldt, MD

Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Twin Cities Spine Center, Allina Integrated Medical Network

Yohan Vetteth

Vice President, Data and Analytics, Stanford Health Care

Elaine Whaley

Director, Infection Prevention and Control, Texas Children's Hospital

Angela Wills

Vice President, Clinical Programs, Vice President, Ambulatory Quality, Vice President of Acute Medicine, Interim Vice President, Medical Associates Operations, Mission Health

Terrill Wolf

Manager, Data Architecture, Clinical and Business Analytics, Stanford Health Care

30-40 Stations with Multiple Presenters

From Health Systems Across the Country

Dale Sanders

Senior Vice President, Health Catalyst

Thomas D. Burton

Co-Founder and Senior Vice President of Product Development, Health Catalyst

Steve Barlow

Co-Founder and Senior Vice President of Client Operations, Health Catalyst

Holly Rimmasch

Chief Clinical Officer, Health Catalyst

Bryan Oshiro, MD

Chief Medical Officer, Health Catalyst

Kathleen Merkley, DNP, APRN

Vice President, Health Catalyst

Anne-Marie Bickmore

Vice President, Health Catalyst

Leslie Hough Falk, RN, MBA

Vice President Customer Success, Health Catalyst

Marie Dunn

Director, Analytics, Health Catalyst

John Wadsworth

Vice President, Technical Operations, Health Catalyst

Russ Staheli

Vice President, Health Catalyst

Eric Just

Vice President of Technology, Health Catalyst

Bobbi Brown

Vice President, Financial Engagement Health Catalyst

Dan LeSueur

Vice President, Technical Operations, Health Catalyst

Peter Monaco

Senior Business Intelligence Developer, Health Catalyst

Cherbon VanEtten

Director of Education, Health Catalyst

Ross Gustafson

Vice President, Allina Performance Resources, Health Catalyst

Documentary Follow-up

Caleb Stowell (Vice-President Research and Development, International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM), Senior Researcher, Harvard Business School)

The Future World of Value-Based Healthcare (Documentary)

Caleb Stowell (Vice-President Research and Development, International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM), Senior Researcher, Harvard Business School)

The world is a mix of different health delivery and payment systems but one truth is becoming evident as demonstrated by organizations at the leading edge of delivering value-based healthcare. Healthcare is better when patient outcomes are placed at the forefront of healthcare with all other decisions pivoting around clinical measures of care that define what matters most to patients. This shift to value marks a turning point by leading health systems who have historically focused reporting primarily on process metrics that many regulators require. Join us for an insightful look into three organization’s efforts to deliver value-based healthcare.

Improving Analytics and Processes to Ease Hospital Crowding

Wes Elfman (Visualization Developer, Clinical and Business Analytics, Stanford Health Care )
Terrill Wolf (Manager, Data Architecture, Clinical and Business Analytics, Stanford Health Care )

Hospital leadership knows from experience that certain weeks in December and January are much busier than the rest of the year, leading to potential ED crowding, hospital-cancelled OR cases, and transfer center denials. How do we improve the processes and analytical support to make better, data-driven decisions during the crunch time? Can we continually enhance the process and analytics for other unexpected busy times throughout the year? This session will describe how Stanford Health Care is improving the operating system with a goal to create a coordinated system with high reliability for quality, service and efficiency, that provides care for all patients who want or need services at Stanford Health Care.

Closing Remarks

Dan Burton (Chief Executive Officer, Health Catalyst)

One for all: Building a sustainable ecosystem to support enterprise-wide biological and clinical research

Samuel L. Volchenboum, MS, MD, PhD (Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Director, Informatics Program, The University of Chicago Medicine )

Resources dedicated to research are difficult to fund, build, maintain, and democratize. Often, research groups are funded in hopes that they will collaborate and share resources with other groups throughout the institution. In practice, this is difficult to achieve and often leads to the creation of silos and a scarcity of resources to support other research groups. The University of Chicago Center for Research Informatics (CRI) was created in 2011 with a mandate to provide collaborative research services to all research groups. With institutional funding, four cooperative channels of operation were established: systems and infrastructure, bioinformatics, application development, and data warehousing. Starting with only five people, the CRI currently has over forty staff and has developed a highly sustainable model for supporting all research programs, from basic science to clinical trials. This session will focus on the substrate necessary for forming such a group, recommendations for building and growing the operation, and tips for building a sustainable ecosystem for research.

How Allina Uses Analytics to Improve Outcomes (including documentary)

Timothy Sielaff, MD, PhD, FACS (Chief Medical Officer, Allina Health )

Concluding Session – Health Catalyst Academy

Thomas D. Burton (Co-Founder and Senior Vice President of Product Development, Health Catalyst)
Cherbon VanEtten (Director of Education, Health Catalyst)

H – Panel: Our Most Advanced Customers: How to Meet the Growing Demands of Increased Success

Health systems go through different phases as they implement data warehousing and analytics and begin to see outcomes improvement results. The challenges of early implementation and adoption are often different than the challenges faced once data warehousing and analytics have been consistently implemented and success demonstrated. Often times the successes of the initial projects can generate such an interest and desire from others that the organization soon is faced with a different set of prioritization and resource challenges to handle the demand. This is a great problem to have! But anticipating those challenges can make this phase even more successful. In this panel, some of Catalyst’s most advanced customer will give insight around how they have met the challenge of the growing demands of success within their organization.

G – Panel: ACO and Population Health Best Practices

Join leaders from Partners Health Care, OSF, Crystal Run, and HonorHealth as they discuss their organizations’ transition to value-based payment. The session will cover key challenges and success factors for building an analytics strategy to support accountable care, with time for audience questions.

F – Panel: Patient Safety and Patient Injury Prevention Best Practices

This panel of four experts will discuss key best practices that lead to improving patient safety and preventing harm. They will discuss how they are integrating tools, processes, data and analytics to improve outcomes.

E – Panel: How to Maximize your EDW and Analytics Investment with a Services-Value Approach

D – Advanced SAM Best Practices

John Wadsworth (Vice President, Technical Operations, Health Catalyst)

C – Panel: The School of Hard Knocks: Advanced Uses Cases of an EDW

Come and participate in the shared learning of grizzled veterans who have traversed difficult challenges inherent to the typical (or perhaps not-so-typical) EDW deployment. Learn how others are leveraging capabilities for real-time predictive analytics, multi-EMR pragmatic integration for analytics, self-service reporting, BI consolidation and standardization, and more…

B – Panel: Improving Outcomes with Evidence-Based Best Practices in Sepsis Care

This panel will discuss ways to improve early recognition and intervention for sepsis by implementing analytics, clinical interventions, operational improvements, and quality initiatives in your organization.

A – Grow Your Analysts and They'll Pay for Themselves

Russ Staheli ( Vice President, Health Catalyst)
Peter Monaco (Senior Business Intelligence Developer, Health Catalyst)

Healthcare organizations dream of analysts who build reports and dashboards with simple and powerful insights from data. However, those technical and communicative skills take years to develop and longer to hone. How do you make sure your organization is set up to develop analysts into critical cogs in outcomes improvement? In this session, you will learn what it takes to grow analytical skills critical for transforming healthcare, from technical prowess to adaptive leadership

Entering Shared Risk for Community Hospitals Through Physician Engagement

Greg Stock (Chief Executive Officer, Thibodaux Regional Medical Center)
Mark F. Hebert, M.D., F.A.C.S. (Surgical Specialist, Thibodaux Regional Medical Center )

Small community hospitals are the life-blood of medicine in the United States. By and large, however, their CEO’s are not physicians, but businessmen who must deal with the realities of local board, budget, and political pressures. CEO must balance long-term goals with these short-term pressures while rarely feeling secure in their roles as CEO.

Thibodaux Regional Medical Center has historically used Lean principles to wring out cost and achieve improvement. Formerly done by in-house staff with little physician involvement, the administration has engaged more with the physicians within the last year and it is changing Thibodaux’s culture for the better. As Thibodaux attempts to enter to enter the shared-risk market and it is critical to bridge any gap in trust between the affiliate physician-lead groups and the administration. Empowering clinicians to lead the improvement process, Thibodaux has already realized improvements around early recognition of septic patients. Mortality rates were already good, but Thibodaux is now poised to reduce the rate by another 25 percent; truly demonstrating a “never satisfied” improvement culture.

Greg Stock, CEO, Thibodeaux Regional Medical Center and Dr. Mark Hebert will share how the correct methodology enables senior leaders and physicians to more readily and easily partner and collaborate. Most importantly, they will discuss critical need for trust and engagement between the administration and physicians. The relationships are healthier than they have been allowing for more collaboration, alignment of incentives, and team building. And finally, the two will review the positive returns a community hospital can achieve (hard and soft cost savings, improved patient care, positive cultural change, etc.) when physicians and senior leadership use each success as a building block to drive long-term, sustainable change in the future.

Welcome, Opening Keynote

Dan Burton (Chief Executive Officer, Health Catalyst)

Keynote Speakers
Dan Burton – Welcome
CEO, Health Catalyst
Daryl MoreyHouston Rockets’ General Manager
“Bringing Analytics to the NBA”
Jim CollinsAuthor / Co-Author of 6 books including Built to Last, Good to Great and Great By Choice
“Greatness in Turbulent Times”

Greatness in Turbulent Times

Jim Collins (Best Selling Author including Built to Last, Good to Great, and Great By Choice)

Change is accelerating, uncertainty is permanent, and chaos is common.  Why do some leaders and organizations thrive in uncertainty, even chaos, and others do not?  They don’t merely react:  they create.  They don’t merely survive:  they prevail.  They don’t merely succeed:  they thrive.In this session Jim will cover a number of topics including:

  • How the most successful leaders embrace effective behaviors needed to build great organizations
  • Why leaders who understand their organization’s passion, ability, and economic engine are more likely to build great enterprises
  • Where great organizations place their big bets, and how they use those to scale innovation
  • What productive paranoia can help organizations do (and perhaps more importantly, not do)
  • How great leaders think about luck, and what they do with the luck they get

As you think about this session, ponder two of Jim’s most frequently cited quotes:

“Greatness is not a function of circumstances.  Greatness is largely a matter of conscious choice, and discipline.”
– Jim Collins

“Whether you prevail or fail depends more on what you do to yourself than on what the world does to you.”
– Jim Collins

Building Creative and Innovative Organizations

Ed Catmull (Co-founder of Pixar, President of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios)

Ed Catmull outlines techniques and ideas on leading creative and innovative organizations. Some of the leadership philosophies he explores are:
Addressing hidden barriers to creativity and innovation

  • Uncoupling fear and failure
  • Getting the team right (if you want to get the ideas right)
  • Preparing for unknown problems
  • Making the process better, but knowing the true goal is to make something great
  • Ensuring that a company’s communication structure does not mirror its organizational structure.

Behind the Traditions and Rituals
Long before Pixar was one of the world’s most successful movie studios, it was a small hardware company struggling to stay afloat. Ed Catmull, who co-founded the company in 1986 with Steve Jobs and John Lasseter, led Pixar toward its goal of making the first-ever computer animated movie, in turn growing it into the creative, innovative force it is today. Devoted fans of Pixar movies will enjoy this look behind the scenes of the heretofore mysterious world of Pixar, as well as learning about the underlying principles behind their approach. Catmull will also talk about working with Steve Jobs—how Jobs contributed to Pixar and how Pixar transformed Steve Jobs.”

The Moneyball Philosophy: Bringing Analytics to the NBA

Daryl Morey (Houston Rockets’ General Manager, Managing Director of Basketball Operations)

With an unparalleled expertise, Morey provides insights into how leaders can introduce new analytics practices to their organizations. Audiences learn tactics to better structure their own organization’s teams, assets, and systems. Morey provides concrete strategies—even drilling into the statistical science driving the Big Data-Analytics movement, for those groups seeking a true “nuts and bolts” takeaway.

Partners Healthcare Analytic Strategy for Bundled Payments and Risk Management

Timothy G. Ferris, MD, MPH (Senior Vice President for Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare )

As risk-based contracts become more predominate, the need for healthcare organizations to deliver high-quality, safe care with minimum waste will grow. Providers that take on risk in the accountable care environment must focus on developing care management programs for high-need, high-cost patients in order to maintain quality while minimizing costs. This presentation will review Partners’s approach to population health management and managing risk.

Delivering Excellence at Stanford Health Care

Amir Dan Rubin (President and Chief Executive Officer, Stanford Health Care)

TBA

Health Analytics: Driving and Being Driven by Profound Change

Vi Shaffer (Research Vice President, Global Industry Services Director, Healthcare Providers, Gartner)

Market forces, business needs, and technology advances must combine if we are to accomplish the transformation of healthcare. In this session, you will learn:

  • What are the major forces compelling and enabling radical change in the design and delivery of healthcare?
  • How does advanced analytics fit into the picture?
  • What actions should executive and analytics leaders be taking to realize the pivotal role of information in the future of healthcare?

The Healing Power of Data

M. Bridget Duffy, MD (Chief Medical Officer, Vocera Communications, Inc., Former Chief Experience Officer, Cleveland Clinic)

Healthcare organizations today face tremendous pressure to achieve clinical and financial results, often leading to a focus on efficiency and financial performance at the expense of the patient experience. However, organizational and clinical research has demonstrated that the patient experience also influences safety, clinical quality, and financial results.

Leveraging the power of data, there no longer needs to be a tradeoff as we put the science behind the human experience of care. Using a combination of courageous leadership, organizational commitment to a new strategic directions, engaged doctors and nurses, and a systematic way to continuously identify and close gaps in the patient experience, we can restore the human connections in healthcare while still enabling providers to improve clinical outcomes, financial performance and market differentiation.

As a leader in the patient experience movement, Dr. Duffy has spent more than 20 years defining the components of an optimal healing environment and designing innovative ways to restore humanity to healthcare. Dr. Duffy’s work has earned her several accolades. She was named the “2015 Woman of the Year” by Women Health Care Executives and selected as one of the “Most Influential Women in Bay Area Business for 2015” by San Francisco Business Times. In 2014, Dr. Duffy was recognized as a “Health IT Change Agent” by Health IT Outcomes and named among the “Top 50 in Digital Healthcare” by Rock Health. She also earned the Quantum Leap Award for taking the risk to spur internal change in the field of medicine, and was featured in HealthLeaders magazine as one of “20 People Who Make Healthcare Better.”

Panel – Data Governance in Healthcare

The formal governance of valuable assets in corporations and organizations— people, finances, buildings, brand image, equipment— has been in existence for hundreds, maybe thousands, of years. The digital era of human and corporate evolution introduced a new and valuable asset— data. In this new and unprecedented area of asset governance, health system executives are increasingly challenged to define a pragmatic data governance strategy that maximizes the value of data to the mission of their organizations, while minimizing governance overhead.

Adding to that challenge, the competitive nature of the data warehouse and analytics market place has resulted in significant noise from vendors and consultants alike who promise to help health systems develop their data governance strategy. Having gone on his own turbulent data governance ride as a CIO in the US Air Force and healthcare, Dale Sanders, Senior Vice President at Health Catalyst will facilitate a panel with members from multiple health systems who are in different stages of implementing data governance principles. Some topics they will cover will include

  • General concepts of data governance, regardless of industry
  • Unique aspects of data governance in healthcare
  • Common challenges and lessons learned establishing and running healthcare data governance
  • The layers and roles in data governance
  • Data governance in different scenarios and stages

Is Big Data a Big Deal…or Not?

Dale Sanders (Senior Vice President, Health Catalyst)

TBA

The Price is Right: How to Thrive in the New Value-Based Care Delivery World

Thomas D. Burton (Co-Founder and Senior Vice President of Product Development, Health Catalyst)

The Price is Right: How to thrive in the new value-based care delivery world

This session will explore the capabilities required to thrive in a value-based accountable care network in a fun and interactive game show format. Contestants selected from the audience will bid on patient populations to enter into at risk contracts. The winners of the bid will then advance to interactive games designed to teach principles of network optimization, risk stratification and outlier and inlier care management. The finalist may even get the chance to “spin the big wheel” and win a prize. All participants should come away with a deeper understanding of the complexities and strategies to survive the transition away from fee for service and to thrive in a value based environment.

Panel – Best Practices in Achieving Physician Engagement

Join Dr. Bryan Oshiro, MD Chief Medical Officer, Health Catalyst, as he facilitates a panel on key best practices in getting physician engagement. Key topics in the panel will include identifying and empowering physician leaders in key functional teams, compensating for leadership roles, educating and developing a common purpose, team-based approaches, giving quick, easy, and responsive access to the right data to identify problems and make recommendations, and supporting and empowering physician-led recommendations.

Attendees will learn:

  • The importance of physician engagement in quality improvement (the “why”)
  • To describe the challenges and barriers to truly have physicians lead quality improvement (“the what”)
  • To identify strategies to enhance physician engagement (the “how”)

Please join Dr. Oshiro as he brings his background spanning three decades of quality improvement and clinical practice, from Loma Linda University Medical School to Intermountain Healthcare, for what will be an engaging and enlightening session.

Panel – Precision Medicine and Embracing Variability

In January, 2015, President Obama announced a ‘Precision Medicine Initiative’ to better understand diseases so that more personalized care can be provided to patients with diseases like cancer, diabetes, and others. Years of research have led to better understanding of how individual variation plays a role in certain diseases. Precision Medicine aims to tailor treatments to those individuals based on that variation in genes, environment, and lifestyle. While there have been some great advances in our understanding of the variability in certain diseases, there is still a long road ahead in making precision medicine the norm.

Our panelists will discuss the promise as well as the challenges of precision medicine. They will share stories about recent successes in precision medicine, discuss the research required to further our understanding of variability in disease, and the challenges of implementing clinical practices that are based on this variability. Because this initiative will rely on the rapid discovery of new underlying causes for disease and quickly transitioning those research discoveries into clinical practice, there will need to be unprecedented cooperation between the research and care delivery enterprises. Our panelists will offer their insights on this as well the data infrastructure that will be required to make decisions based on a much larger set of clinical and biological information

Using Analytics and Care Coordination to Improve Heart Failure

Spencer H. Kubo, MD (Chief Medical Officer of BioControl Medical, United Heart & Vascular Clinic, Allina Integrated Medical Network)

People with one or more chronic diseases and multiple social needs are high consumers of healthcare services, and are thus a major source of healthcare costs. Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization among adults in the U.S. over 65 years and accounts for over $17 billion in Medicare spending. This case study will review Allina Health’s approach to improving the management of heart failure through coordinated care and data-driven improvement.

How an Integrated Care Program Can Improve Spine Care and Cost Outcomes

Ensor E. Transfeldt, MD (Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Twin Cities Spine Center, Allina Integrated Medical Network )

Low back pain (LBP) is a common and expensive medical problem. The estimated annual associated costs for patients, employers, and insurers resulting from LBP exceed $100 billion per year in the United States, two-thirds of which are a result of lost wages and reduced productivity. This case study will detail how Allina Health is using coordinated care and data-driven improvement to improve spine care.

Eliminating Waste and Reducing Cost: Re-Inventing Value in Cincinnati Children’s

Frederick C. Ryckman, MD (Professor of Surgery/Pediatric Surgery, Sr. Vice President, Medical Operations, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital)

Healthcare will not be able to save enough money by continuing to focus on reducing costs in supply chain, labor costs, and procedures.  We must move to standardizing essential elements of care where the bulk of our costs reside.  Standardization leads to improved safety, efficiency, reliability, patient experience, and outcomes.  And surprisingly, it also leads to greater opportunities for customization when done well.  Join Dr. Frederick Ryckman, Sr. Vice President of Medical Operations, as he shares successes and outcomes in eliminating waste and reducing costs in Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.  Some highlights include:

  • Use of mathematic modeling techniques to “right size” intensive care units and manage urgent and emergent OR case load
  • 10.5 Million in preventable costs through standardization of surgical site infection (SSI) prevention
  • Improve Nurse at the Bedside Staffing and Work flow through predictive modeling and census prediction
  • Use of Tablet based Situational Awareness model to improve workflow and real time information for managers and leaders
  • Using patient entered data to manage chronic complex diseases.

Patient Flight Path Predictor: Using Analytics to Find and Drive the Best Care for Patients

Gregory A Spencer, MD (Chief Medical & Chief Medical Information Officer, Crystal Run Healthcare)
Louis G. Cervone, Jr. (Director of Business Intelligence, Crystal Run Healthcare)

Crystal Run has been developing an analytics-supported approach to patient care using disease-specific metrics, costs, trends, simulation and predicted outcomes to motivate patients, improve outcomes, and decrease costs. Using Diabetes patients as an example, Crystal Run has focused on costs and complications for high-risk and low-risk cohorts by provider and location. From the patient perspective, they are then able to look at patient-specific lab results and costs, care recommendations, and a comparison of current status to predicted complications. During office visits, they will have the ability to share risk levels and care simulations with patients based on their current status and show the predicted impact for of making lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation, improving HgA1C levels, losing weight, decreasing blood pressure, etc. The predictive model is based on multiple regression analysis and Charlson risk scores and compares the individual patient based on their current status to the experience and clinical progression of similar patients. The session will explore questions such as, “How can we measure health?” and “What factors can predict health?”. The answers to these questions are at the core of building an effective predictive analytics model.

Integrating Process and Informatics at CO Kaiser Permanente to Achieve Benchmark Cardiovascular Outcomes

John A. Merenich MD, FACP, FNLA (Medical Director, CO Kaiser Permanente Clinical Informatics and Decision Support)

The session will describe how Kaiser Permanente CO has integrated people/processes with a variety of informatics tools over the past 15 years to reduce age-adjusted cardiovascular (CV) events by over 60% during the period.

Key discussion points:

  • Matching metrics with clinical and business lead metrics on a continuous basis
  • Using tools to support team based–not physician centric–care delivery
  • Risk stratifying to match resources to appropriate level of patient need
  • Making CV interventions actionable: CV gaps
  • Integrating CV registry and gaps into the daily (EHR) workflow
  • Means to increase individualized, personalized care and Shared Decision Making: Integrated CV Health

How Mayo Clinic Standardized Care Across 22 Emergency Departments

Christopher S. Russi, DO, FACEP (Chair - Division of Community Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic)

This session aims to review the strategy and vision necessary to begin standardizing the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine across a large geographic and economically disperse area. We will review why clinical integration is critical in today’s healthcare world but emphasize that success is likely limited without investments in high quality, enthusiastic, engaged healthcare providers. Within one year the results included:

  • Reduced transfer rates
  • Dropped service line write-offs
  • Improved billing and coding
  • Rising HCAHPS scores
  • Increased success with hiring and retention saving significant contract hiring costs.

Multicare – Organizing for Accountable Care and Population Health

Christopher Kodama, MD, MBA, FAAP (President, MultiCare Connected Care)
Christi McCarren, RN, MBA, CPHQ (Vice President, Retail Health & Service Lines, Multicare Health System)

Learn how an integrated health system organized for population health management and leveraged data warehousing, analytics, and knowledge management to reduce mortality from septicemia and demonstrate promising results in lowering heart failure readmissions. Multicare will also discuss their strategies for organizing and using data and analytics to scale quality improvement and for developing an organizational culture of continuous improvement.

Quality Improvement in Healthcare: An ACO Palliative Care Case Study

Dr. Robert Sawicki, MD (Senior Vice President, Supportive Care, OSF Healthcare )
Roopa Foulger (Executive Director, Data Delivery, OSF Healthcare)
Linda Fehr, RN (Division Director, Supportive Care, OSF HealthCare )

To succeed under value-based care, it is critical that organizations effectively coordinate care in the effort to maximize quality and safety, while minimizing costs and waste. Healthcare organizations need to understand patients’ needs and values and incorporate them into all health decisions. OSF HealthCare, one of the first pioneer ACOs, and the recipient of the 2014 Illinois Hospital Association (IHA) Institute for Innovations in Care and Quality Tim Philipp Award for Excellence in Palliative and End-of-Life Care, will discuss how their community-wide supportive care initiative has successfully maximized value for the populations they serve and helped drive physician engagement.

How One Accountable Care Organization is Using ACO Analytics to Position Itself for Population Health Management and Shared Savings

James J. Dearing, DO, FACOFP, FAAFP (Vice President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Medical Officer, Accountable Care Organization, Honor Health)

Healthcare reform means providers must improve quality and slow spending growth—and accountable care organizations (ACOs) are on the leading edge of tackling this challenge. This case study will explore how the Honor Health ACO is using analytics to create a foundation for achieving shared savings and successfully managing population health.

Building improvement capability at Stanford through the Radiology Improvement Team Education (RITE) program

David B. Larson, MD, MBA (Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology), Stanford University Medical Center)
Jake Mickelsen (Lean Six Sigma-Black Belt, Quality Improvement Education Manager, Department of Radiology, Stanford University)

Achieving real performance improvement requires more than just data. The authors of this popular hands-on course at Stanford share how they empower teams of physicians, technologists, nurses, and administrative staff to simultaneously learn improvement methods and solve meaningful challenges important to the organization. Learn how they balance structure and accountability with freedom to learn and “fail small, fail fast, fail friendly” as frontline staff solve problems in their own areas. One graduate reported, “it fueled, ignited, and inspired my passion for excellence, learning, and compassion.”

$74M in Healthcare Operational Improvements: How Texas Children’s Hospital is Delivering on Its Vision

Mark Mullarkey (Senior Vice President, Texas Children's Hospital, President, Texas Children’s Physician Group)

In an environment of declining reimbursement and growing competition, all healthcare organizations must reduce costs in order to maintain profitability. To improve financial performance and prepare for the future, Texas Children’s launched a highly successful system-wide performance improvement project designed to increase accessibility to high-quality care for patients while also increasing revenues and driving significant operational savings.

Clinical Standards Work To Improve Evidence-Based Care Delivery: A How-To Workshop

Charles Macias, MD, MPH (Chief Clinical Systems Integration Officer, Texas Children’s Hospital)
Terri Brown, MSN, RN, CPN (Assistant Director, Clinical Outcomes & Data Support; Research Specialist, Center for Research and EBP, Texas Children’s Hospital)

Texas Children’s has driven the science of care delivery through Clinical Standards work emanating from their Evidence Based Outcomes Center (EBOC). The center produces evidence based guidelines, evidence summaries and evidence informed pathways through systematic development processes.  Over the course of 7 years, EBOC has developed over 38 full evidence based guidelines, has developed or supported the development of over 20 evidence based summaries, and has trained over 100 clinicians to develop evidence based products for use as shared baselines.  These efforts have led to decreases in unwanted care variation improving patient and financial outcomes. Additionally, this work is estimated to have eliminated millions of dollars of waste in care delivery.

This workshop will provide learners with a roadmap for developing and implementing clinical standards work in their own healthcare systems.  As TCH launches a national consortium of children’s hospitals who will collaborate on clinical standards work, this workshop will provide the background and theory necessary for participating in the consortium. However, the workshop is not limited to only those participants, as the learning is applicable to all settings.

Panel – How Community Hospitals Thrive with Analytics

Come learn how three community hospitals are leveraging analytics to improve clinical outcomes, decrease costs, increase physician engagement and increase market share. Kevin Croston MD, CEO from North Memorial, Gene Thomas CIO from Memorial at Gulfport and Greg Stock CEO from Thibodaux will share varied methods of analytic adoption to sustain their hospital systems.

Panel – Children’s Hospitals: “Tike-mares”…Are the Monsters Under the Bed For Real?

“Tike –mares” are the monsters under the bed real?  This guided panel discussion explores the quality, efficiency and cost monsters that lurk under the bed for pediatric healthcare delivery.

The Value of OSF's EDW and Analytics Culture: How They Delivered $9-$12M in Performance Improvements

Mark Hohulin (Senior Vice President, Healthcare Analytics, OSF Healthcare System )
Roopa Foulger (Executive Director, Data Delivery, OSF Healthcare)

A few years ago OSF began its journey into analytics. Realizing this is only a 30 percent technical solution, it worked hard to build organizational support from key leaders. This resulted in greater than a $9 million in savings in terms of hard dollars or cost avoidance. In this case study, OSF will discuss its journey, some of the lessons learned along the way, and wisdom from failures that have been turned into wins.

Taking Waste Out of Prostate Cancer: Access, Screening, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Outcomes

Jay T. Bishoff, MD, FACS (Director, Intermountain Urological Institute, Intermountain Healthcare)

It is nearly impossible to point a surgical instrument, in any direction, in the OR , without finding an area where quality improvement processes can be implemented to improve outcomes and decrease significant amounts of waste and inefficiency resulting in better results with lower cost. Literally millions of dollars are being wasted every day in every OR in this nation and you can be the one who starts the process to stop the madness. In this session Dr. Bishoff will share the results from recent projects, which have had this exact result. He will demonstrate how leadership principles can be combined with quality improvement to make meaningful change.

After this session the participants will be able to :

  1. Understand how to untangle a stalled out process delivering poor results and identify specific impact points for meaningful and positive change
  2. Discuss many, specific examples of quality improvement resulting in better outcomes with significant cost savings
  3. Create a detailed plan of action turning quality improvement principles into specific projects when you return home from the conference.

Partner Healthcare’s Approach to Population Health Management

Sreekanth Chaguturu, MD (Vice President for Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare)
Helen Chan (Senior Manager, Business Planning, Partners Healthcare)

As risk-based contracts become more predominate, the need for healthcare organizations to deliver high-quality, safe care with minimum waste will grow. Providers that take on risk in the accountable care environment must focus on developing care management programs for high-need, high-cost patients in order to maintain quality while minimizing costs. This presentation will review Partners’s approach to population health management and managing risk.

How to Drive Organizational Culture Change and Realize Improved Surgical Outcomes

Kathleen Carberry, R.N., M.P.H. (Director, Outcomes and Impact Service, Texas Children’s Hospital)

Appendicitis is the most common acute surgical condition of the abdomen with approximately 250,000 cases of appendicitis annually in the United States. These cases account for an estimated one million hospital days per year and consume 11.8 percent of all hospital discharges for gastrointestinal diseases. This case study will detail how Texas Children’s Hospital is using analytics technology, team-based processes, and evidence-based best practices to drive higher quality, lower cost care for appendicitis.

Analytics Walkabout

30-40 Stations with Multiple Presenters (From Health Systems Across the Country)

Scroll down to see a list of the topics and stations

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The Analytics Walkabout is new to HAS’15. This experience consists of 35 – 45 different analytics-driven projects featured at individual stations. Attendees will be able to talk to front-line leaders at each station twice during HAS ‘15. The first Analytics Walkabout session will be during the Tuesday evening registration reception starting at 6:00 p.m. The second AW session will be during the 2 hour break after the last general session presentation prior to dinner.

These Analytics Walkabout stations are intended to be 10 minute sessions where you can quickly learn about analytics-related projects across a wide variety of clinical, financial, technical and leadership topics. Outcomes improvement often consists of a multitude of smaller, agile projects. We want to provide a wide variety of different projects, tailored for many different team member roles and types. Our intent is to provide something for everyone.

Of course, in the spirit of learning and fun, we will include an interactive game on the HAS 15 app, awarding points and prizes for those that complete at least 6 station visits. The following is a partial list of Analytics Walkabout projects:

  • Exclusive breastfeeding
  • Patient progress assessment
  • Readmissions
  • Heart failure
  • Evidence based decision making
  • VTE
  • Integration
  • How to select a vendor
  • Aligning ERP, EMR, and EDW strategies
  • Healthcare acquired conditions
  • Predictive analytics
  • Centralized analytics to meet organizational demand
  • Data governance for analytics
  • Physician compensation model
  • Variance reduction in labs, rad, meds
  • Executive engagement, participation, and prioritization
  • Missing documentation transparency with physicians
  • Use of EDW for PQRS submission
  • Leveraging Community Care to change care delivery
  • Small and large bowel standardization
  • Analytics journey / data driven culture
  • OR dashboard, operational workflow
  • Palliative care
  • ACO
  • How to use cost accounting data to drive improved value
  • Episodes of care
  • Healthcare directions
  • Atlas meta repository
  • Organizational alignment
  • SPS
  • Population registries
  • Appendectomy outcomes
  • Financial ROI
  • Undiagnosed diabetes
  • Eligibility denial reduction in cardiology
  • Shifting from descriptive to predictive and prescriptive analytics

What Others Are Saying About the Importance of Healthcare Analytics

  • "Rapid retrieval of relevant data is the most important benefit. Today, I can look up in a matter of seconds information that took me months to find in the past — if it was available at all. This night and day difference is so revolutionary, I feel like I’ve lived through the discovery of electricity."

    Dr. Charles Macias, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine Director, Center for Clinical Effectiveness and the Evidence-Based Outcome Center at Baylor/Texas Children's Hospital

  • “It is not just the delivery of care, but how to arrange for care delivery that we have to consider if we want to succeed as an ACO. We are doing a lot of ‘what if’ analysis now that we could not do before: Which patients go to a certain office? Are they sicker in one area as opposed to another? Answers to these questions help us arrange care to meet our population’s needs. We are becoming a medical logistics organization, and advanced analytics makes it possible.”  

    Greg Spencer, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Crystal Run Healthcare

  • “There’s a tremendous amount of excitement around here now about getting hands on data; we can’t get it to people fast enough. But that’s a nice problem to have – people want what your department can offer them.”

    Jon Brown, Vice President, Associate CIO, Mission Health

  • “The EDW has brought a whole new level of transparency to patient satisfaction in our organization. Now clinicians, operations personnel and executives throughout the hospital have access to dynamic data—and they can customize their views to see the information that interests them in the format they want to see it. The process is much more user friendly and effective than what we had in the past.”

    Ashley Simms, Senior Project Manager

  • "We look to patient satisfaction as a way to connect with families and see how well we’re serving them. It provides an important gauge of how effective our operations are in any particular unit of the organization. Now, with our satisfaction data integrated into the EDW, we can also analyze with accuracy how the quality improvement initiatives we’re implementing are affecting patient satisfaction. Having patient satisfaction as a balance measure to these other initiatives enhances the effectiveness of our improvement program."

    Elisa Mozley, Assistant Director of Patient & Family Services

  • Memorial has driven significant quality improvements over the years but we will eventually hit a wall if we can’t analyze and understand all of the data we’re collecting and build that knowledge into our decision-making process,”

    Gene Thomas, Chief Information Officer of Memorial Hospital at Gulfport, Mississippi.