Join us at HAS 16 – September 6-8, 2016 in Salt Lake City

Keynote Sessions

Educational Sessions

    Healthcare Analytics: The DIY Project where Possible is Not Likely

    Taylor Davis (Vice President, Analysis and Strategy, KLAS )

    Have you ever seen a DIY project on YouTube or television that looked simple, only to realize after attempting it yourself that it was much more complicated than you ever expected? The problem with DIY is that while a project is possible, it is often not likely that the average viewer can replicate the success.

    Similarly, healthcare analytics is a difficult space, where vendors sell tools that ‘can’ do amazing things but often fall short when real health systems implement them. Which vendors are doing the best job of helping their customers all the way to successful outcomes? What is the reality of today’s healthcare BI adoption? With most health systems employing at least three enterprise BI toolsets, which solutions are bringing the most value?


    Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie or Die

    Eric Siegel, PhD (Best Selling Author and Founder of Predictive Analytics World)

    Predictive analytics fortifies healthcare. It addresses today’s pressing challenges in healthcare effectiveness and economics by improving operations across the spectrum of healthcare functions, including:

    • Clinical services and other healthcare management operations such as targeting screening and compliance intervention
    • Insurance pricing and management
    • Healthcare product marketing
    • Reducing costs and streamlining

    Applied in these areas, predictive analytics serves to improve patient care, reduce cost, and bring greater efficiencies. In this keynote address, Eric Siegel will cover today’s rapidly emerging movement to fortify healthcare with big data’s biggest win: the power to predict.


    Leading Adaptive Change to Create Value (2 hour deep dive session)

    Val Ulstad, MD, MPA, MPH (Chief Engagement Officer, Partners at Cascade Bluff, LLC )

    Adaptive leadership maps the territory of human behavior, describing what people do and how they behave when faced with change. Its concepts and practices can create systemwide value by creating clarity that empowers others to make progress in their work. This is especially critical to healthcare, as the industry is burdened by complex problems, scare resources, and fast-paced change. In this 2-hour session you will see how to apply the fundamentals of adaptive leadership to help you become more effective and purposeful when driving change.


    How to Measure and Get an ROI out of your Outcomes Improvement Projects

    Bobbi Brown (Senior Vice President, Financial Engagement, Health Catalyst)
    Leslie Falk, MBA, RN, PMP (Senior VP of Customer Success, Health Catalyst)

    A cultural divide exists between clinicians and the finance department, and nowhere is this more apparent than when trying to measure ROI on improvement projects. But it doesn’t have to be that way. This session will explore steps healthcare organizations can take to establish a framework that enables communication among multidisciplinary teams, including finance, and provides guidance to make investments that enhance quality while lowering costs. Real-world ROI exercises and case studies will be presented along with lessons learned on the road to success.


    Turn Your Analysts into Data Detectives: Discvoreing Pttaerns in Dtaa

    John Wadsworth, MS (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)

    You have an EDW with dozens of data sources tethered onto a common platform. The platform has many applications driving hundreds of daily reports. As you survey the rich data landscape, how can you identify the best nuggets that will lead to meaningful mining? Come to this session to learn tips on how to find trends, and how to architect solutions that support maximizing your data mining efforts.


    Outcomes Improvement Governance: Engaging Executives for Success

    Susan Easton (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)
    Thomas D. Burton (Co-Founder and Executive Vice President, Health Catalyst)

    Moving your organization from “the craft of medicine” toward a more efficient, reliable—and continually improving—system of production takes strong governance structures. This session will show you how to create capable, engaged, and empowered teams that will drive the outcomes improvement mindset throughout your organization using a sequence of steps, including recommended actions and resources to help along the way. Informed by work with health systems across the nation, this guide to governance will help you achieve sustainable outcomes improvement for your organization and your organization’s patients.


    New Competencies for Succeeding in Risk-based Arrangements

    Bobbi Brown (Senior Vice President, Financial Engagement, Health Catalyst)
    Dan Unger, MBA (VP Product Development, Financial Decision Support, Health Catalyst )
    Lynn M. Guillette (Vice President, Payment Innovation, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health)

    Whether you are ready for it or not your organization is going to start taking on more financial risk through alternative payment models. Most organizations today are not armed with the right data or skills to take on at-risk contracts to a meaningful level.

    Learn about the new competencies needed to survive and thrive under the new economic framework of fee for value. This session will include lessons learned from healthcare organizations around the country and concrete steps to start developing, or further mature, the key skills in your own organization.


    Building an Enterprise Analytics Organization

    Joseph M. Dudas (Division Chair, Enterprise Analytics, Mayo Clinic)

    This session will focus on Mayo Clinic’s most recent refresh of their Enterprise Analytics five-year business plan. Attendees will see the results of a comprehensive assessment that was done 12 months ago, what Mayo Clinic had planned to do to address gaps, and how it is doing now (both successes and shortcomings). Instead of the technology itself, this presentation will focus on how to structure your organization to get the most out of your technology investments.

    According to Mayo Clinic’s assessment, 90 percent of analyst time is spent gathering information and producing reports, and only 10 percent is spent gaining insights and making suggestions. Joe will also talk about their strategy to address analytics needs in days or weeks, as opposed to months or years.


Case Study Sessions

    UPMC’s System-Wide Change to Service Lines— Supported by Activity-Based Costing: The Blueprint to Healthcare Improvement Efforts

    Robert P. Edwards, MD (Milton Lawrence McCall Professor)
    Paula Lounder (Director, UPMC Payer Provider Programs )

    The way in which health systems are typically organized, managed, and budgeted (as departments and units within separate hospitals) can work against them when they attempt to improve population health and decrease costs. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), a large health system with more than 20 hospitals and 500 clinics, was keenly aware of this challenge as it embarked on population health and value-based care initiatives that spanned the entire organization. UPMC leaders recognized that in order to improve care and compete in today’s healthcare market, they needed to change their paradigm: they needed to consider all of the services they offered from a patient perspective (rather than from a facility or departmental perspective), and they needed to solve the costing problem—devise new ways to accurately measure the cost of providing care across the continuum and to relate the true cost of care to patient outcomes.

    Attend this case study session to see how UPMC is using the service line approach and activity-based accounting to identify unnecessary costs and variation, and improving women’s health outcomes. Discover the strategies that worked to improve outcomes: aligning leaders from finance and operations; creating interdisciplinary teams; using analytics and data to understand and share variation with physicians; using data to change physician behavior; engaging physicians; exploring opportunities with payers, and more.


    From the Boardroom to the Bedside – Using Analytics to Drive a Culture of Continuous Improvement

    Chris DeRienzo, MD, MPP (Chief Quality Officer, Mission Health)
    Jon Brown (Chief Information Officer, Mission Health)
    Michael Creech, BSEE, LSSBB, LSSMBB (Vice President Process Engineering & Applied Analytics, Mission Health System)

    Mission Health is a $1.6 billion integrated delivery system based in Western North Carolina that includes six hospitals, numerous outpatient and ambulatory sites, an employed physician group, and a large post-acute network of services. In order to fully realize the promise of Mission’s BIG(GER) AIM—to get each patient to his or her desired outcome, first without harm, also without waste and with an exceptional experience for the patient and family—Mission sought to instill a culture of continuous improvement within all 11,000+ members of its team. From bedside caregivers to the CEO, Mission has successfully leveraged the power of analytics to build this culture and begin turning its enterprise-wide flywheel of continuous improvement.

    This breakout session will review the specifics of Mission’s journey, including how it laid the cultural bricks, built out its analytics toolbox, and began driving engagement with physicians, leaders, and caregivers of every kind. The presenters from Mission will review the methodology they used to rapidly achieve widespread adoption of analytics tools, as well as how they routinely assess maturity and readiness for next steps at both the entity and the local levels. Finally, they will highlight a selection of their results in both the clinical and operational spaces, ultimately providing attendees with a “recipe for success” to bring home on how to use analytics to drive a culture of continuous improvement.


    Patients Don't Measure Quality Care—They Experience it

    Glenn Drayer (Director of Enterprise Business Intelligence, Stanford Hospital & Clinics)
    Mysti Smith-Bentley, RN, MBA (Administrative Director, Service Excellence, Stanford Health Care)

    It’s a fact that healthcare is joining the age of consumerism. The cost of care and, most importantly, the quality and ease of service are crucial factors in determining patient satisfaction. Stanford Health Care, already committed to providing the highest quality of care, saw an opportunity to be on the forefront of the growth in consumerism and proactively increase their attention to the factors that impact patient satisfaction.

    With nearly 700,000 clinic visits a year, Stanford knew that working with the clinicians who interact with patients during clinic visits was the path to develop a systematic approach to delivering high quality service, improving patient communications, and increasing transparency. Join Stanford as they define the steps that have led to engaged physicians, an improved experience for patients, and ultimately higher patient satisfaction scores its organization. The presenters will review the educational tools that helped to engage physicians in improving patient experience and embracing transparency, the importance of a positive physician work experience and how that impacts patient experience, the need for strong governance, and the value of a patient-based care approach.


    Improved Outcomes and a Proven ROI Model for Quality Improvement: Transforming Diabetes Care (Case Study)

    Charles G. Macias, MD, MPH (Chief Clinical Systems Integration Officer, Texas Children’s Hospital)

    Texas Children’s Hospital is committed to improving care for diabetic patients—one of the most common diseases in school-aged children. So, when it noticed a measurable degree of variation in its management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) patients, a particularly complex and serious complication of diabetes, it launched an enterprise-wide campaign to drive diabetes care improvement.

    Join Texas Children’s as it describes how analytics enabled clinical and operational improvements that resulted in higher quality diabetes care in the inpatient setting while simultaneously documenting the cost effectiveness of care process improvement teams. The session will specifically review how Texas Children’s: transformed its care infrastructure and care processes—including order set utilization, timeliness of ordering and administering insulin; used patient risk stratification patient risk to improve outcomes. You will also discover a framework that Texas Children’s developed in collaboration with the school at Rice University to better understand the return on investment (ROI) of its quality improvement efforts.


    Predictive Analytic Models – a Must in the Journey to Reducing Readmissions

    Karen Tomes, RN, MA, PHN (Vice President Care Management & Coordination, Allina Health)

    Allina Health—a 13-hospital health system serving Minnesota and Wisconsin—believes that patients deserve to receive optimum follow-up care and support after discharge from the hospital, an approach that helps to minimize readmissions. Like many health systems nationwide, Allina Health had to prepare for the potential of CMS penalties for poor readmission performance and for emerging pay-for-outcomes reimbursement model.

    This session will review the multipronged approach that Allina Health employed to successfully reduce its 30-day potentially preventable readmissions (PPRs). Allina Health will outline the specific actions they took including the development of a predictive analytic model that supports the identification of at-risk patients. The session will also highlight additional actions they identified as key success factors in their journey to reduce readmissions including redesigned care management processes and education programs for patients, families, and clinicians. The results Allina Health has achieved to-date validate that this multipronged approach is a model worth following.


    The Geisinger Hedged Unified Data Architecture

    John Kravitz, MHA, CHCIO (Senior Vice President and CIO, Geisinger Health System)
    Alistair Erskine, MD (Chief Strategic Information Officer, Geisinger Health System)

    With the advent of digitalized medicine, it becomes increasingly important to share approaches to derive value from a deluge of data. We will describe Geisinger Unified Data Architecture, a hedged data environment, which combines the benefits of traditional SQL data warehouse with contemporary Big Data/Hadoop environment. We will discuss specific examples of benefit realization from each platform, including Cerner Healthe Intent, HortonWorks, Microsoft SQL, Teradata, and Epic Cogito. We will share our experience managing structured, unstructured, streaming, and real-time data to augment EHR functionality and our population health mission.


    Actionable Analytics: From Predictive Modeling to Workflows

    Chad Konchak, MBA (Director, Clinical Analytics, NorthShore University HealthSystem)

    The value of analytics is only realized when those models and tools are integrated into workflows to support data-driven decision making. In this presentation, the NorthShore Clinical Analytics team will showcase their suite of predictive models and analytical tools and how we have used various forms of EMR functionality to integrate them into clinical workflows. The team will describe use cases that cover population health, syndromic surveillance, and hospital quality where analytics efforts have led to better data-driven decision making. We will show how these data-driven tools led to better quality and financial outcomes. We will discuss both the modeling techniques used, tool development processes, and how we considered “implementability” (how easy it would be to implement the tool into a data supply chain that fed clinical workflows) in the design. We will also go into detail on the various forms of EMR functionality we used to feed our analytics (calculated outside of the EMR) back into the system. NorthShore will also describe the standardization techniques we have implemented to ensure our predictive modeling efforts adhered to standard methodological considerations. This presentation will describe the analytics environment that was set up and the people, process and technology governance structures that were created to ensure quality, consistency, and maintenance of our analytics.


    Integrating Detailed Patient Level Costs With Outcomes and Quality Metrics

    Charlton Park, MBA, MHSM (Chief Analytics Officer, University of Utah Health Care)

    With stiff competition, uncertain payment reform and razor thin margins, some may wonder why University of Utah (UoU) Healthcare would aggressively push to be transparent with its Value Driven Outcomes (VDO) Initiative. Yet, the results have been mutually beneficially for business and patients and have created a competitive advantage for the UoU health system.

    Analytics that make transparent patient care costs and related outcomes are critical to increasing value in today’s healthcare environment. At the UoU health system, distributed teams now have access to key analytic reports that put cost, outcomes and quality data at their fingertips. With this analytic foundation, the system now provides actionable data to providers so they understand the variations in cost and outcomes in order to do what is right for their patients from a cost perspective in addition to quality. The results are material and have led to double digit increases in quality and reduction in costs across multiple care processes.


    An 85% prediction model? Advances in Sepsis Prediction at Johns Hopkins

    Suchi Saria, PhD (Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University)

    Led by Professor Suchi Saria, a team of data scientists at Johns Hopkins University have made substantial advances in accurately predicting the patients most likely to experience septic shock. On the back end of a six-year study period, the research team drew from a 16,000 patient data set. Eighty five percent of the time, their prediction model successfully predicted septic shock. And equally important, Such’s work did not require additional screening.
    Join Suchi and several from their team as they share lessons learned across the six year study including both clinical implementation and IT development challenges that they faced. In its last stage of testing in collaboration with clinical teams, these tools may soon become available to others. Join us in learning more.


    Improve Reported Outcome Measures With Standardized Care Processes

    Amber Theel RN, BSN, MBA, CPHQ, CPHRM (Director of Quality Outcomes and Metrics, MultiCare Health System)
    Jess Bouma, MD (Hospitalist, MultiCare Inpatient Services, Tacoma General and Allenmore Hospitals)

    Readmission and mortality rates for patients with pneumonia are a national performance measure, and something many health systems struggle to improve. Coupled with the reality that nearly 1.1 million patient hospitalizations utilizing more than 5.7 million inpatient days each year in the United States, pneumonia patients present a high opportunity for quality and
    process improvements.

    To improve the care of, cost of, and experience for pneumonia patients, MultiCare Health System, an integrated care network, launched an improvement effort to standardize pneumonia care. Join MultiCare as they discuss how they realized significant improvements through the merging of effective planning, people, and processes. Presenters will cover the key areas to consider and the elements needed to improve outcomes:

    • Recognize the strengths and limitations of publicly reported measures in identifying opportunities for improvement.
    • Identify how in-depth planning informed by analytics saves time in the long run and leads to better decisions that more effectively support evidence-based care for patients.
    • Identify the positive impact standardized, evidence-based order sets that are designed to respect the workflow of individual departments have on patient outcomes.
    • Recognize the strength of the interdisciplinary team in designing and successfully implementing redesigned care processes.


    Do No Harm: Reducing Hospital-Acquired Conditions Through Cultural Transformation, Analytics, and Education (Case Study)

    Abby Dexter (Director - Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin)
    Holly O’Brien, MSN, RN, CPPS (Safety Program Manager, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin)

    Children’s Hospital Of Wisconsin’s (CHW) is one of the nation’s top pediatric hospitals consisting of two hospitals and a surgery center. To support its vision of “healthiest kids in the nation”, CHW is driven by the desire to improve patient quality and reduce inpatient length of stay. The prevention of hospital-acquired-conditions (HACs) is an important element of achieving that and is a top priority for CHW.

    While CHW had improvement teams in place for many years to address specific HACs, little improvement had resulted due to poor access to data and a lack of cultural buy-in to the improvement process. CHW leaders knew that major changes would be needed, including the creation of the right environment and infrastructure to support their renewed efforts to reduce HACs across its health system.

    Learn how CHW is successfully reducing HACs with organization-wide commitment, from the board of directors to frontline teams. The session will review CHW’s formula for success, highlighting the key criteria of their formula including:

    • Need for an effective leadership, governance and a data-driven culture
    • Access to good data and the technologies to leverage it
    • Education and a team-based approach that emphasize transparency of data and outcomes


    Partners’ Care Management Strategy: A 10-Year Journey (2 hour deep dive session)

    Sree Chaguturu, MD (Vice President for Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare)
    Eric M. Weil, MD (Associate Chief for Clinical Affairs, MGH Division of General Internal Medicine)

    Chronic diseases are responsible for seven out of 10 deaths each year, killing more than 1.7 million Americans annually. Additionally, 133 million Americans—approximately 45 percent of the population—have at least one chronic disease. Partners HealthCare believes that chronically ill patients with multiple medical conditions often need the most help coordinating their care, which is why this well-respected health system has spent the last 10 years perfecting an integrated care management program (iCMP).

    Key elements of the iCMP at Partners include access to specialized resources (e.g., mental health, palliative care), involvement through the continuum of care, patient self-management, IT-enabled systems to improve care coordination, data-driven analytics to support strategic decision making, a payer-blind approach, and ongoing support and training for its teams and staff.

    Attend this two-hour session, as Partners HealthCare reviews its journey to successful integrated care management. Objectives of this session include learning the essential elements of an effective care management program for chronically ill patients, understanding how care management plays a key role in an effective population health management strategy, and learning how to use information to identify and effectively manage complex, chronically ill patients.


    Population Health Management – Driving Improved Outcomes in Women’s Services Through Collaboration and Analytics (Case Study)

    Stephen Poore, MS, MD, FACOG (Medical Director of Women's Health, MultiCare Health System)
    Maureen Faccia, MBA (Director of Women’s and Retail Health Services, MultiCare Health System)

    One in three pregnant women give birth via cesarean section in the United States, which is more than double the rate the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends. MultiCare Health System, an integrated care delivery system, is committed to ensuring that women who choose MultiCare receive the same high-quality care regardless of their treatment location. Standardizing care, however──and asking providers to change long-held patterns of behavior──is not an easy task.

    Join MultiCare to learn how it was able to improve and standardize care for pregnant women, driving down C-section rates to less than 33 percent of the national average while simultaneously improving episiotomy rates, surgical site infection rates, and third or fourth degree perineal laceration rates.

    This discussion will enable attendees to:

    • Identify organizational structures to effectively set up and empower successful clinical improvement teams.
    • Define strategies to engage/support providers for effective practice changes.
    • Recognize the power of analytics in highlighting performance and opportunities for improvement.
    • Demonstrate the positive impact that standardized clinical content can have on patient outcomes.


    Improving Outcomes in a Value-Based Environment: Holistic Care Management for Complex Medical Conditions (2 Hour Deep Dive Case Study Session)

    Kyle Grunder, MBA (Director of Operations, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute)
    Jill E. Henly, MSW, LCSW (Manager, Care Coordination and Social Work, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute)

    Allina Health improved the quality of the lives of its patients with complex medical conditions, while saving its community $11.2M annually through innovative care management in a value-based environment. A challenging task for any population but especially notable when accomplished in support of a high-risk, high-cost population.

    With approximately 15 percent of United States’ citizens affected by disability- Allina Health’s Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute (CKRI) was established to support patients with disabilities, injuries, and complex medical conditions in achieving the highest possible degree of health, functioning, and quality of life. CKRI leaders knew that in order to achieve these goals they needed to create a multidisciplinary, collaborative care model that focused on the whole person—one that looked beyond the medical to address vocational, social, and emotional needs.

    This two-hour session will cover CKRI’s journey in developing an innovative care management model that used analytics to improve and measure patient and financial outcomes in a value-based, at-risk environment.


Technical Sessions

    Text Analytics: You Need More than NLP (Technical Session)

    Eric Just (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)

    We need NLP” often really means “we want to extract value out of our text data”. In order to extract value out of text data, healthcare organizations need a variety of tools. Natural Language Processing (or NLP) is only one of these tools. Text searching is one of the most accessible tools to bring healthcare text data to life. Through text searching, clinicians can quickly retrieve text of interest by typing simple search query terms. We will talk about text search tools, how NLP and other techniques enhance text search, and how to build text search tools into informatics and clinical workflows to achieve maximum value from the richness of text data.


    Security frameworks in data warehousing and their interplay with healthcare analytics (Technical Session)

    Patrick Nelli (Senior VP, CAFÉ Product Line, Health Catalyst)

    In this session we will cover key areas of security and data de-identification as it relates to healthcare analytics. Areas of focus will include security frameworks and best practices around auditing and monitoring. We will discuss how these frameworks can be applied in a cloud-based environment and the analytics benefits that can be associated with both monitoring and cloud-based environments. Furthermore, we will discuss the spectrum of data de-identification frameworks and their interplay with analytics. We will walk through how all of these ideas have shaped our development of the Health Catalyst CAFÉ analytics environment in the Azure cloud environment.


    Deploying Predictive Analytics: A Practitioner’s Guide (Technical Session)

    Eric Just (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)

    This session will focus on the technical and practical aspects of creating and deploying predictive analytics. We have seen an emerging need for predictive analytics across clinical, operational, and financial domains. One pitfall we’ve seen with predictive analytics is that while many people with access to free tools can develop predictive models, many organizations fail to provide a sufficient infrastructure in which the models are deployed in a consistent, reliable way and truly embedded into the analytics environment. We will survey techniques that are used to get better predictions at scale. This session won’t be an intense mathematical treatment of the latest predictive algorithms, but will rather be a guide for organizations that want to embed predictive analytics into their technical and operational workflows.

    Topics will include:

    • Reducing the time it takes to develop a model
    • Automating model training and retraining
    • Feature engineering
    • Deploying the model in the analytics environment
    • Deploying the model in the clinical environment


    Powerful Ways to Use Hadoop in your Healthcare Big Data Strategy (Technical Session)

    Sean Stohl (Senior VP, Product Development, Health Catalyst)
    Bryan Hinton (Senior VP, Platform Engineering, Health Catalyst)

    Big Data, Big Data, Big Data – everybody is talking about it, but why and how is it being done? Come ready to talk about emerging healthcare big data use cases that are begging for the help of practical and powerful technologies like Spark, Kafka, Hive, and Elastic Search. If applied appropriately, these technologies can rev up your data warehouse and help you to address evolving data-driven healthcare needs around unstructured data, real-time data feeds, and machine learning.

    Armed with technical and clinical know-how, Bryan and Sean will tag team to give you a practical understanding where to get started with these technologies. Together, they will also give you a glimpse how they think these technologies will evolve over time.


    FHIR’d up about Clinical Data Intelligence: Cleveland Clinic’s Real Time Decision Support System (Technical Session)

    Brent Hicks (Director of Clinical Solutions, Cleveland Clinic)
    Suzanne Fink MSN, RN, CCRN (Clinical Analyst, Clinical Solutions Center (CSC), Cleveland Clinic)

    A huge amount of waste exists across health systems with duplicate efforts reinterpreting patient chart data many times over. A solution to this problem represents significant cost savings by addressing and activating a dynamic process up front in the clinical workflow resulting in an exponential impact within real time patient care, back end processes and closed loop predictive modeling. A lot of worthy focus is placed on EMR interoperability and new web data standards for healthcare but without data veracity all these efforts are moot.

    Still the solution is elusive for most health systems due in part to the data challenges of EMR’s that are notoriously onerous to customize—as well as understanding the clinical nuances of stored data.

    Yet, with some breakthrough discoveries all health systems will want to learn from, Cleveland Clinic has developed a real-time decision support system with admirable results. With this, the ability to liberate high fidelity data from the proprietary EMR bubble, using new standards like FHIR, becomes viable. To achieve this, Cleveland Clinic has constructed a team of developers and clinicians with overlapping clinical and technical knowledge using agile development methods versus traditional waterfall processes. The blend of skills and process has been key to the team’s success being able to trace data end-to-end. In addition to technical expertise, Cleveland Clinic’s team has demonstrated success by persistently and patiently navigating a bureaucratic structure of policy and legacy enterprise EMR’s common to many large health systems


Analytics Walkabout Sessions

    Analytics Walkabout

    32 Stations with Multiple Presenters (From Health Systems Across the Country)

    The Analytics Walkabout was first introduced last year and is back by popular demand for HAS 16. This year’s experience will consist of 32 different analytics-driven projects featured at individual stations.

    Attendees will be able to talk to front-line leaders at each station twice during HAS 16 . The first Analytics Walkabout session will be during the Tuesday evening registration reception starting at 6:00 p.m. The second AW session will be during the Wednesday morning breakfast session prior to the opening of the general opening session. These Analytics Walkabout stations are intended to be 10 minute sessions where you can quickly learn about analytics-related projects across a wide variety of clinical, financial, technical and leadership topics. Outcomes improvement often consists of a multitude of smaller, agile projects. We want to provide a wide variety of different projects, tailored for many different team member roles and types. Our intent is to provide something for everyone.

    The following is a list of stations and projects that are under development with more to come.

    • ACO measures
    • Antibiotic usage
    • Bowel surgery
    • Cardiovascular (3-4)
    • Community care
    • Co-locating EMRs
    • Cost accounting
    • Faster time to reporting
    • Glycemic control
    • Identifying research cohorts
    • Imaging operations and overreads
    • Improvement methodology
    • Length of stay (3)
    • Sepsis (3)
    • ROI
    • Infectious disease
    • Patient access
    • Practice management
    • Practice variance
    • Professional billing
    • Readmissions
    • Reducing denials claims
    • Reducing discharge times
    • Reducing ED admissions
    • Revenue cycle
    • Registries
    • Supply chain variation and procurement

    View more details


Pre-Summit Client Sessions

Health Catalyst

Subject Matter Expert

Don Berwick, MD

Former Administrator, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

David F. Torchiana, MD

President and Chief Executive Officer, Partners HealthCare System, Inc.

Anne Milgram

Former New Jersey Attorney General, Senior Fellow at NYU School of Law

Ben Bache-Wiig, MD

Senior Vice President, West Region and President, Abbott Northwestern Hospital

Craig E. Strauss, MD, MPH

Medical Director, Minneapolis Heart Institute Center for Healthcare Delivery Innovation

Eric Siegel, PhD

Best Selling Author and Founder of Predictive Analytics World

John Kravitz, MHA, CHCIO

Senior Vice President and CIO, Geisinger Health System

Toby Freier

FACHE President, New Ulm Medical Center

Jay T. Bishoff, MD, FACS

Director, Intermountain Urological Institute, Intermountain Healthcare

Alistair Erskine, MD

Chief Strategic Information Officer, Geisinger Health System

Dale Sanders

Executive Vice President, Health Catalyst

Charlton Park, MBA, MHSM

Chief Analytics Officer, University of Utah Health Care

Thomas D. Burton

Co-Founder and Executive Vice President, Health Catalyst

Brent Hicks

Director of Clinical Solutions, Cleveland Clinic

Liz Wiseman

Bestselling Author, Speaker, and Executive Advisor

Allina Health

Healthcare Executive TBA – Coming Soon

Paul Horstmeier

Senior Vice President, Health Catalyst

Suchi Saria, PhD

Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Charles G. Macias, MD, MPH

Chief Clinical Systems Integration Officer, Texas Children’s Hospital

Dan Burton

Chief Executive Officer, Health Catalyst

Taylor Davis

Vice President, Analysis and Strategy, KLAS

Chad Konchak, MBA

Director, Clinical Analytics, NorthShore University HealthSystem

Sree Chaguturu, MD

Vice President for Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare

Chris DeRienzo, MD, MPP

Chief Quality Officer, Mission Health

Karen Tomes, RN, MA, PHN

Vice President Care Management & Coordination, Allina Health

Jon Brown

Chief Information Officer, Mission Health

Eric M. Weil, MD

Associate Chief for Clinical Affairs, MGH Division of General Internal Medicine

Val Ulstad, MD, MPA, MPH

Chief Engagement Officer, Partners at Cascade Bluff, LLC

Terri Brown, MSN, RN, CPN

Assistant Director, Clinical Outcomes & Data Support; Research Specialist, Center for Research and EBP, Texas Children’s Hospital

Paula Lounder

Director, UPMC Payer Provider Programs

Robert P. Edwards, MD

Milton Lawrence McCall Professor

Abby Dexter

Director - Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin

Maureen Faccia, MBA

Director of Women’s and Retail Health Services, MultiCare Health System

Holly O’Brien, MSN, RN, CPPS

Safety Program Manager, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

Mysti Smith-Bentley, RN, MBA

Administrative Director, Service Excellence, Stanford Health Care

Monique Ross

Director of Hospital/ED Care Management, Allina Health

32 Stations with Multiple Presenters

From Health Systems Across the Country

Suzanne Fink MSN, RN, CCRN

Clinical Analyst, Clinical Solutions Center (CSC), Cleveland Clinic

Steve Barlow

Co-Founder and Senior Vice President of Client Operations, Health Catalyst

Holly Rimmasch

Chief Clinical Officer, Health Catalyst

Bryan Oshiro, MD

Chief Medical Officer, Health Catalyst

Kathleen Merkley, DNP, APRN

Vice President, Health Catalyst

Anne-Marie Bickmore

Vice President, Health Catalyst

Marie Dunn

Director, Analytics, Health Catalyst

Russ Staheli

Vice President, Health Catalyst

Eric Just

Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst

Jess Bouma, MD

Hospitalist, MultiCare Inpatient Services, Tacoma General and Allenmore Hospitals

Glenn Drayer

Director of Enterprise Business Intelligence, Stanford Hospital & Clinics

Stephen Poore, MS, MD, FACOG

Medical Director of Women's Health, MultiCare Health System

Nicholas Marko, MD

Chief Data Officer, Geisinger

Dan LeSueur

Vice President, Technical Operations, Health Catalyst

Peter Monaco

Senior Business Intelligence Developer, Health Catalyst

Cherbon VanEtten

Vice President of Education, Health Catalyst

Ross Gustafson

Vice President, Allina Performance Resources, Health Catalyst

Kyle Grunder, MBA

Director of Operations, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute

Amber Theel RN, BSN, MBA, CPHQ, CPHRM

Director of Quality Outcomes and Metrics, MultiCare Health System

Jill E. Henly, MSW, LCSW

Manager, Care Coordination and Social Work, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute

Michael Creech, BSEE, LSSBB, LSSMBB

Vice President Process Engineering & Applied Analytics, Mission Health System

Lynn M. Guillette

Vice President, Payment Innovation, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health

Joseph M. Dudas

Division Chair, Enterprise Analytics, Mayo Clinic

Leslie Falk, MBA, RN, PMP

Senior VP of Customer Success, Health Catalyst

Sean Stohl

Senior VP, Product Development, Health Catalyst

Patrick Nelli

Senior VP, CAFÉ Product Line, Health Catalyst

Dan Unger, MBA

VP Product Development, Financial Decision Support, Health Catalyst

Bryan Hinton

Senior VP, Platform Engineering, Health Catalyst

Susan Easton

Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst

Bobbi Brown

Senior Vice President, Financial Engagement, Health Catalyst

John Wadsworth, MS

Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst

Leveraging Data and Strong Partnerships To Thrive In The Land Between Volume And Value

Ben Bache-Wiig, MD (Senior Vice President, West Region and President, Abbott Northwestern Hospital)
Craig E. Strauss, MD, MPH (Medical Director, Minneapolis Heart Institute Center for Healthcare Delivery Innovation)

HAS 16 Welcome and Overview

Dan Burton (Chief Executive Officer, Health Catalyst)

Keynote Speakers
Dan Burton – Welcome
CEO, Health Catalyst

How Partners HealthCare Uses Data and Analytics to Improve Population Health

David F. Torchiana, MD ( President and Chief Executive Officer, Partners HealthCare System, Inc.)

Taking Waste Out of Care: Access, Screening, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Outcomes

Jay T. Bishoff, MD, FACS (Director, Intermountain Urological Institute, Intermountain Healthcare)

Criminal Justice Analytics and Insights for Healthcare

Anne Milgram (Former New Jersey Attorney General, Senior Fellow at NYU School of Law)

The Price is Right, Round 2 - Thriving in the New World of Value Based Care

Thomas D. Burton (Co-Founder and Executive Vice President, Health Catalyst)

Day 1 in Review

Paul Horstmeier ( Senior Vice President, Health Catalyst)

The Challenges and Opportunities in Using Data and Analytics to Improve Healthcare Outcomes

Don Berwick, MD (Former Administrator, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services)

Population Health: Lessons from One of the Nation’s Most Innovative Rural Community Models (Documentary: Hearts Beat Back: The Heart of the New Ulm Project)

Dale Sanders (Executive Vice President, Health Catalyst)
Toby Freier (FACHE President, New Ulm Medical Center)

Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work

Liz Wiseman (Bestselling Author, Speaker, and Executive Advisor )

UPMC’s System-Wide Change to Service Lines— Supported by Activity-Based Costing: The Blueprint to Healthcare Improvement Efforts

Robert P. Edwards, MD (Milton Lawrence McCall Professor)
Paula Lounder (Director, UPMC Payer Provider Programs )

The way in which health systems are typically organized, managed, and budgeted (as departments and units within separate hospitals) can work against them when they attempt to improve population health and decrease costs. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), a large health system with more than 20 hospitals and 500 clinics, was keenly aware of this challenge as it embarked on population health and value-based care initiatives that spanned the entire organization. UPMC leaders recognized that in order to improve care and compete in today’s healthcare market, they needed to change their paradigm: they needed to consider all of the services they offered from a patient perspective (rather than from a facility or departmental perspective), and they needed to solve the costing problem—devise new ways to accurately measure the cost of providing care across the continuum and to relate the true cost of care to patient outcomes.

Attend this case study session to see how UPMC is using the service line approach and activity-based accounting to identify unnecessary costs and variation, and improving women’s health outcomes. Discover the strategies that worked to improve outcomes: aligning leaders from finance and operations; creating interdisciplinary teams; using analytics and data to understand and share variation with physicians; using data to change physician behavior; engaging physicians; exploring opportunities with payers, and more.

The Transformational Mindset: Best Practices from 3 Leading Health Systems

Allina Health (Healthcare Executive TBA – Coming Soon)
MultiCare Health System (TBA)
Texas Children's Hospital (TBA)

Text Analytics: You Need More than NLP (Technical Session)

Eric Just (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)

We need NLP” often really means “we want to extract value out of our text data”. In order to extract value out of text data, healthcare organizations need a variety of tools. Natural Language Processing (or NLP) is only one of these tools. Text searching is one of the most accessible tools to bring healthcare text data to life. Through text searching, clinicians can quickly retrieve text of interest by typing simple search query terms. We will talk about text search tools, how NLP and other techniques enhance text search, and how to build text search tools into informatics and clinical workflows to achieve maximum value from the richness of text data.

Security frameworks in data warehousing and their interplay with healthcare analytics (Technical Session)

Patrick Nelli (Senior VP, CAFÉ Product Line, Health Catalyst)

In this session we will cover key areas of security and data de-identification as it relates to healthcare analytics. Areas of focus will include security frameworks and best practices around auditing and monitoring. We will discuss how these frameworks can be applied in a cloud-based environment and the analytics benefits that can be associated with both monitoring and cloud-based environments. Furthermore, we will discuss the spectrum of data de-identification frameworks and their interplay with analytics. We will walk through how all of these ideas have shaped our development of the Health Catalyst CAFÉ analytics environment in the Azure cloud environment.

Deploying Predictive Analytics: A Practitioner’s Guide (Technical Session)

Eric Just (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)

This session will focus on the technical and practical aspects of creating and deploying predictive analytics. We have seen an emerging need for predictive analytics across clinical, operational, and financial domains. One pitfall we’ve seen with predictive analytics is that while many people with access to free tools can develop predictive models, many organizations fail to provide a sufficient infrastructure in which the models are deployed in a consistent, reliable way and truly embedded into the analytics environment. We will survey techniques that are used to get better predictions at scale. This session won’t be an intense mathematical treatment of the latest predictive algorithms, but will rather be a guide for organizations that want to embed predictive analytics into their technical and operational workflows.

Topics will include:

  • Reducing the time it takes to develop a model
  • Automating model training and retraining
  • Feature engineering
  • Deploying the model in the analytics environment
  • Deploying the model in the clinical environment

Powerful Ways to Use Hadoop in your Healthcare Big Data Strategy (Technical Session)

Sean Stohl (Senior VP, Product Development, Health Catalyst)
Bryan Hinton (Senior VP, Platform Engineering, Health Catalyst)

Big Data, Big Data, Big Data – everybody is talking about it, but why and how is it being done? Come ready to talk about emerging healthcare big data use cases that are begging for the help of practical and powerful technologies like Spark, Kafka, Hive, and Elastic Search. If applied appropriately, these technologies can rev up your data warehouse and help you to address evolving data-driven healthcare needs around unstructured data, real-time data feeds, and machine learning.

Armed with technical and clinical know-how, Bryan and Sean will tag team to give you a practical understanding where to get started with these technologies. Together, they will also give you a glimpse how they think these technologies will evolve over time.

FHIR’d up about Clinical Data Intelligence: Cleveland Clinic’s Real Time Decision Support System (Technical Session)

Brent Hicks (Director of Clinical Solutions, Cleveland Clinic)
Suzanne Fink MSN, RN, CCRN (Clinical Analyst, Clinical Solutions Center (CSC), Cleveland Clinic)

A huge amount of waste exists across health systems with duplicate efforts reinterpreting patient chart data many times over. A solution to this problem represents significant cost savings by addressing and activating a dynamic process up front in the clinical workflow resulting in an exponential impact within real time patient care, back end processes and closed loop predictive modeling. A lot of worthy focus is placed on EMR interoperability and new web data standards for healthcare but without data veracity all these efforts are moot.

Still the solution is elusive for most health systems due in part to the data challenges of EMR’s that are notoriously onerous to customize—as well as understanding the clinical nuances of stored data.

Yet, with some breakthrough discoveries all health systems will want to learn from, Cleveland Clinic has developed a real-time decision support system with admirable results. With this, the ability to liberate high fidelity data from the proprietary EMR bubble, using new standards like FHIR, becomes viable. To achieve this, Cleveland Clinic has constructed a team of developers and clinicians with overlapping clinical and technical knowledge using agile development methods versus traditional waterfall processes. The blend of skills and process has been key to the team’s success being able to trace data end-to-end. In addition to technical expertise, Cleveland Clinic’s team has demonstrated success by persistently and patiently navigating a bureaucratic structure of policy and legacy enterprise EMR’s common to many large health systems

From the Boardroom to the Bedside – Using Analytics to Drive a Culture of Continuous Improvement

Chris DeRienzo, MD, MPP (Chief Quality Officer, Mission Health)
Jon Brown (Chief Information Officer, Mission Health)
Michael Creech, BSEE, LSSBB, LSSMBB (Vice President Process Engineering & Applied Analytics, Mission Health System)

Mission Health is a $1.6 billion integrated delivery system based in Western North Carolina that includes six hospitals, numerous outpatient and ambulatory sites, an employed physician group, and a large post-acute network of services. In order to fully realize the promise of Mission’s BIG(GER) AIM—to get each patient to his or her desired outcome, first without harm, also without waste and with an exceptional experience for the patient and family—Mission sought to instill a culture of continuous improvement within all 11,000+ members of its team. From bedside caregivers to the CEO, Mission has successfully leveraged the power of analytics to build this culture and begin turning its enterprise-wide flywheel of continuous improvement.

This breakout session will review the specifics of Mission’s journey, including how it laid the cultural bricks, built out its analytics toolbox, and began driving engagement with physicians, leaders, and caregivers of every kind. The presenters from Mission will review the methodology they used to rapidly achieve widespread adoption of analytics tools, as well as how they routinely assess maturity and readiness for next steps at both the entity and the local levels. Finally, they will highlight a selection of their results in both the clinical and operational spaces, ultimately providing attendees with a “recipe for success” to bring home on how to use analytics to drive a culture of continuous improvement.

Patients Don't Measure Quality Care—They Experience it

Glenn Drayer (Director of Enterprise Business Intelligence, Stanford Hospital & Clinics)
Mysti Smith-Bentley, RN, MBA (Administrative Director, Service Excellence, Stanford Health Care)

It’s a fact that healthcare is joining the age of consumerism. The cost of care and, most importantly, the quality and ease of service are crucial factors in determining patient satisfaction. Stanford Health Care, already committed to providing the highest quality of care, saw an opportunity to be on the forefront of the growth in consumerism and proactively increase their attention to the factors that impact patient satisfaction.

With nearly 700,000 clinic visits a year, Stanford knew that working with the clinicians who interact with patients during clinic visits was the path to develop a systematic approach to delivering high quality service, improving patient communications, and increasing transparency. Join Stanford as they define the steps that have led to engaged physicians, an improved experience for patients, and ultimately higher patient satisfaction scores its organization. The presenters will review the educational tools that helped to engage physicians in improving patient experience and embracing transparency, the importance of a positive physician work experience and how that impacts patient experience, the need for strong governance, and the value of a patient-based care approach.

Improved Outcomes and a Proven ROI Model for Quality Improvement: Transforming Diabetes Care (Case Study)

Charles G. Macias, MD, MPH (Chief Clinical Systems Integration Officer, Texas Children’s Hospital)

Texas Children’s Hospital is committed to improving care for diabetic patients—one of the most common diseases in school-aged children. So, when it noticed a measurable degree of variation in its management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) patients, a particularly complex and serious complication of diabetes, it launched an enterprise-wide campaign to drive diabetes care improvement.

Join Texas Children’s as it describes how analytics enabled clinical and operational improvements that resulted in higher quality diabetes care in the inpatient setting while simultaneously documenting the cost effectiveness of care process improvement teams. The session will specifically review how Texas Children’s: transformed its care infrastructure and care processes—including order set utilization, timeliness of ordering and administering insulin; used patient risk stratification patient risk to improve outcomes. You will also discover a framework that Texas Children’s developed in collaboration with the school at Rice University to better understand the return on investment (ROI) of its quality improvement efforts.

Predictive Analytic Models – a Must in the Journey to Reducing Readmissions

Karen Tomes, RN, MA, PHN (Vice President Care Management & Coordination, Allina Health)

Allina Health—a 13-hospital health system serving Minnesota and Wisconsin—believes that patients deserve to receive optimum follow-up care and support after discharge from the hospital, an approach that helps to minimize readmissions. Like many health systems nationwide, Allina Health had to prepare for the potential of CMS penalties for poor readmission performance and for emerging pay-for-outcomes reimbursement model.

This session will review the multipronged approach that Allina Health employed to successfully reduce its 30-day potentially preventable readmissions (PPRs). Allina Health will outline the specific actions they took including the development of a predictive analytic model that supports the identification of at-risk patients. The session will also highlight additional actions they identified as key success factors in their journey to reduce readmissions including redesigned care management processes and education programs for patients, families, and clinicians. The results Allina Health has achieved to-date validate that this multipronged approach is a model worth following.

The Geisinger Hedged Unified Data Architecture

John Kravitz, MHA, CHCIO (Senior Vice President and CIO, Geisinger Health System)
Alistair Erskine, MD (Chief Strategic Information Officer, Geisinger Health System)

With the advent of digitalized medicine, it becomes increasingly important to share approaches to derive value from a deluge of data. We will describe Geisinger Unified Data Architecture, a hedged data environment, which combines the benefits of traditional SQL data warehouse with contemporary Big Data/Hadoop environment. We will discuss specific examples of benefit realization from each platform, including Cerner Healthe Intent, HortonWorks, Microsoft SQL, Teradata, and Epic Cogito. We will share our experience managing structured, unstructured, streaming, and real-time data to augment EHR functionality and our population health mission.

Actionable Analytics: From Predictive Modeling to Workflows

Chad Konchak, MBA (Director, Clinical Analytics, NorthShore University HealthSystem)

The value of analytics is only realized when those models and tools are integrated into workflows to support data-driven decision making. In this presentation, the NorthShore Clinical Analytics team will showcase their suite of predictive models and analytical tools and how we have used various forms of EMR functionality to integrate them into clinical workflows. The team will describe use cases that cover population health, syndromic surveillance, and hospital quality where analytics efforts have led to better data-driven decision making. We will show how these data-driven tools led to better quality and financial outcomes. We will discuss both the modeling techniques used, tool development processes, and how we considered “implementability” (how easy it would be to implement the tool into a data supply chain that fed clinical workflows) in the design. We will also go into detail on the various forms of EMR functionality we used to feed our analytics (calculated outside of the EMR) back into the system. NorthShore will also describe the standardization techniques we have implemented to ensure our predictive modeling efforts adhered to standard methodological considerations. This presentation will describe the analytics environment that was set up and the people, process and technology governance structures that were created to ensure quality, consistency, and maintenance of our analytics.

Integrating Detailed Patient Level Costs With Outcomes and Quality Metrics

Charlton Park, MBA, MHSM (Chief Analytics Officer, University of Utah Health Care)

With stiff competition, uncertain payment reform and razor thin margins, some may wonder why University of Utah (UoU) Healthcare would aggressively push to be transparent with its Value Driven Outcomes (VDO) Initiative. Yet, the results have been mutually beneficially for business and patients and have created a competitive advantage for the UoU health system.

Analytics that make transparent patient care costs and related outcomes are critical to increasing value in today’s healthcare environment. At the UoU health system, distributed teams now have access to key analytic reports that put cost, outcomes and quality data at their fingertips. With this analytic foundation, the system now provides actionable data to providers so they understand the variations in cost and outcomes in order to do what is right for their patients from a cost perspective in addition to quality. The results are material and have led to double digit increases in quality and reduction in costs across multiple care processes.

An 85% prediction model? Advances in Sepsis Prediction at Johns Hopkins

Suchi Saria, PhD (Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University)

Led by Professor Suchi Saria, a team of data scientists at Johns Hopkins University have made substantial advances in accurately predicting the patients most likely to experience septic shock. On the back end of a six-year study period, the research team drew from a 16,000 patient data set. Eighty five percent of the time, their prediction model successfully predicted septic shock. And equally important, Such’s work did not require additional screening.
Join Suchi and several from their team as they share lessons learned across the six year study including both clinical implementation and IT development challenges that they faced. In its last stage of testing in collaboration with clinical teams, these tools may soon become available to others. Join us in learning more.

Healthcare Analytics: The DIY Project where Possible is Not Likely

Taylor Davis (Vice President, Analysis and Strategy, KLAS )

Have you ever seen a DIY project on YouTube or television that looked simple, only to realize after attempting it yourself that it was much more complicated than you ever expected? The problem with DIY is that while a project is possible, it is often not likely that the average viewer can replicate the success.

Similarly, healthcare analytics is a difficult space, where vendors sell tools that ‘can’ do amazing things but often fall short when real health systems implement them. Which vendors are doing the best job of helping their customers all the way to successful outcomes? What is the reality of today’s healthcare BI adoption? With most health systems employing at least three enterprise BI toolsets, which solutions are bringing the most value?

Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie or Die

Eric Siegel, PhD (Best Selling Author and Founder of Predictive Analytics World)

Predictive analytics fortifies healthcare. It addresses today’s pressing challenges in healthcare effectiveness and economics by improving operations across the spectrum of healthcare functions, including:

  • Clinical services and other healthcare management operations such as targeting screening and compliance intervention
  • Insurance pricing and management
  • Healthcare product marketing
  • Reducing costs and streamlining

Applied in these areas, predictive analytics serves to improve patient care, reduce cost, and bring greater efficiencies. In this keynote address, Eric Siegel will cover today’s rapidly emerging movement to fortify healthcare with big data’s biggest win: the power to predict.

Leading Adaptive Change to Create Value (2 hour deep dive session)

Val Ulstad, MD, MPA, MPH (Chief Engagement Officer, Partners at Cascade Bluff, LLC )

Adaptive leadership maps the territory of human behavior, describing what people do and how they behave when faced with change. Its concepts and practices can create systemwide value by creating clarity that empowers others to make progress in their work. This is especially critical to healthcare, as the industry is burdened by complex problems, scare resources, and fast-paced change. In this 2-hour session you will see how to apply the fundamentals of adaptive leadership to help you become more effective and purposeful when driving change.

How to Measure and Get an ROI out of your Outcomes Improvement Projects

Bobbi Brown (Senior Vice President, Financial Engagement, Health Catalyst)
Leslie Falk, MBA, RN, PMP (Senior VP of Customer Success, Health Catalyst)

A cultural divide exists between clinicians and the finance department, and nowhere is this more apparent than when trying to measure ROI on improvement projects. But it doesn’t have to be that way. This session will explore steps healthcare organizations can take to establish a framework that enables communication among multidisciplinary teams, including finance, and provides guidance to make investments that enhance quality while lowering costs. Real-world ROI exercises and case studies will be presented along with lessons learned on the road to success.

Turn Your Analysts into Data Detectives: Discvoreing Pttaerns in Dtaa

John Wadsworth, MS (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)

You have an EDW with dozens of data sources tethered onto a common platform. The platform has many applications driving hundreds of daily reports. As you survey the rich data landscape, how can you identify the best nuggets that will lead to meaningful mining? Come to this session to learn tips on how to find trends, and how to architect solutions that support maximizing your data mining efforts.

Outcomes Improvement Governance: Engaging Executives for Success

Susan Easton (Senior VP, Client Engagement, Health Catalyst)
Thomas D. Burton (Co-Founder and Executive Vice President, Health Catalyst)

Moving your organization from “the craft of medicine” toward a more efficient, reliable—and continually improving—system of production takes strong governance structures. This session will show you how to create capable, engaged, and empowered teams that will drive the outcomes improvement mindset throughout your organization using a sequence of steps, including recommended actions and resources to help along the way. Informed by work with health systems across the nation, this guide to governance will help you achieve sustainable outcomes improvement for your organization and your organization’s patients.

New Competencies for Succeeding in Risk-based Arrangements

Bobbi Brown (Senior Vice President, Financial Engagement, Health Catalyst)
Dan Unger, MBA (VP Product Development, Financial Decision Support, Health Catalyst )
Lynn M. Guillette (Vice President, Payment Innovation, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health)

Whether you are ready for it or not your organization is going to start taking on more financial risk through alternative payment models. Most organizations today are not armed with the right data or skills to take on at-risk contracts to a meaningful level.

Learn about the new competencies needed to survive and thrive under the new economic framework of fee for value. This session will include lessons learned from healthcare organizations around the country and concrete steps to start developing, or further mature, the key skills in your own organization.

Building an Enterprise Analytics Organization

Joseph M. Dudas (Division Chair, Enterprise Analytics, Mayo Clinic)

This session will focus on Mayo Clinic’s most recent refresh of their Enterprise Analytics five-year business plan. Attendees will see the results of a comprehensive assessment that was done 12 months ago, what Mayo Clinic had planned to do to address gaps, and how it is doing now (both successes and shortcomings). Instead of the technology itself, this presentation will focus on how to structure your organization to get the most out of your technology investments.

According to Mayo Clinic’s assessment, 90 percent of analyst time is spent gathering information and producing reports, and only 10 percent is spent gaining insights and making suggestions. Joe will also talk about their strategy to address analytics needs in days or weeks, as opposed to months or years.

Improve Reported Outcome Measures With Standardized Care Processes

Amber Theel RN, BSN, MBA, CPHQ, CPHRM (Director of Quality Outcomes and Metrics, MultiCare Health System)
Jess Bouma, MD (Hospitalist, MultiCare Inpatient Services, Tacoma General and Allenmore Hospitals)

Readmission and mortality rates for patients with pneumonia are a national performance measure, and something many health systems struggle to improve. Coupled with the reality that nearly 1.1 million patient hospitalizations utilizing more than 5.7 million inpatient days each year in the United States, pneumonia patients present a high opportunity for quality and
process improvements.

To improve the care of, cost of, and experience for pneumonia patients, MultiCare Health System, an integrated care network, launched an improvement effort to standardize pneumonia care. Join MultiCare as they discuss how they realized significant improvements through the merging of effective planning, people, and processes. Presenters will cover the key areas to consider and the elements needed to improve outcomes:

  • Recognize the strengths and limitations of publicly reported measures in identifying opportunities for improvement.
  • Identify how in-depth planning informed by analytics saves time in the long run and leads to better decisions that more effectively support evidence-based care for patients.
  • Identify the positive impact standardized, evidence-based order sets that are designed to respect the workflow of individual departments have on patient outcomes.
  • Recognize the strength of the interdisciplinary team in designing and successfully implementing redesigned care processes.

Do No Harm: Reducing Hospital-Acquired Conditions Through Cultural Transformation, Analytics, and Education (Case Study)

Abby Dexter (Director - Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin)
Holly O’Brien, MSN, RN, CPPS (Safety Program Manager, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin)

Children’s Hospital Of Wisconsin’s (CHW) is one of the nation’s top pediatric hospitals consisting of two hospitals and a surgery center. To support its vision of “healthiest kids in the nation”, CHW is driven by the desire to improve patient quality and reduce inpatient length of stay. The prevention of hospital-acquired-conditions (HACs) is an important element of achieving that and is a top priority for CHW.

While CHW had improvement teams in place for many years to address specific HACs, little improvement had resulted due to poor access to data and a lack of cultural buy-in to the improvement process. CHW leaders knew that major changes would be needed, including the creation of the right environment and infrastructure to support their renewed efforts to reduce HACs across its health system.

Learn how CHW is successfully reducing HACs with organization-wide commitment, from the board of directors to frontline teams. The session will review CHW’s formula for success, highlighting the key criteria of their formula including:

  • Need for an effective leadership, governance and a data-driven culture
  • Access to good data and the technologies to leverage it
  • Education and a team-based approach that emphasize transparency of data and outcomes

Partners’ Care Management Strategy: A 10-Year Journey (2 hour deep dive session)

Sree Chaguturu, MD (Vice President for Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare)
Eric M. Weil, MD (Associate Chief for Clinical Affairs, MGH Division of General Internal Medicine)

Chronic diseases are responsible for seven out of 10 deaths each year, killing more than 1.7 million Americans annually. Additionally, 133 million Americans—approximately 45 percent of the population—have at least one chronic disease. Partners HealthCare believes that chronically ill patients with multiple medical conditions often need the most help coordinating their care, which is why this well-respected health system has spent the last 10 years perfecting an integrated care management program (iCMP).

Key elements of the iCMP at Partners include access to specialized resources (e.g., mental health, palliative care), involvement through the continuum of care, patient self-management, IT-enabled systems to improve care coordination, data-driven analytics to support strategic decision making, a payer-blind approach, and ongoing support and training for its teams and staff.

Attend this two-hour session, as Partners HealthCare reviews its journey to successful integrated care management. Objectives of this session include learning the essential elements of an effective care management program for chronically ill patients, understanding how care management plays a key role in an effective population health management strategy, and learning how to use information to identify and effectively manage complex, chronically ill patients.

Population Health Management – Driving Improved Outcomes in Women’s Services Through Collaboration and Analytics (Case Study)

Stephen Poore, MS, MD, FACOG (Medical Director of Women's Health, MultiCare Health System)
Maureen Faccia, MBA (Director of Women’s and Retail Health Services, MultiCare Health System)

One in three pregnant women give birth via cesarean section in the United States, which is more than double the rate the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends. MultiCare Health System, an integrated care delivery system, is committed to ensuring that women who choose MultiCare receive the same high-quality care regardless of their treatment location. Standardizing care, however──and asking providers to change long-held patterns of behavior──is not an easy task.

Join MultiCare to learn how it was able to improve and standardize care for pregnant women, driving down C-section rates to less than 33 percent of the national average while simultaneously improving episiotomy rates, surgical site infection rates, and third or fourth degree perineal laceration rates.

This discussion will enable attendees to:

  • Identify organizational structures to effectively set up and empower successful clinical improvement teams.
  • Define strategies to engage/support providers for effective practice changes.
  • Recognize the power of analytics in highlighting performance and opportunities for improvement.
  • Demonstrate the positive impact that standardized clinical content can have on patient outcomes.

Improving Outcomes in a Value-Based Environment: Holistic Care Management for Complex Medical Conditions (2 Hour Deep Dive Case Study Session)

Kyle Grunder, MBA (Director of Operations, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute)
Jill E. Henly, MSW, LCSW (Manager, Care Coordination and Social Work, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute)

Allina Health improved the quality of the lives of its patients with complex medical conditions, while saving its community $11.2M annually through innovative care management in a value-based environment. A challenging task for any population but especially notable when accomplished in support of a high-risk, high-cost population.

With approximately 15 percent of United States’ citizens affected by disability- Allina Health’s Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute (CKRI) was established to support patients with disabilities, injuries, and complex medical conditions in achieving the highest possible degree of health, functioning, and quality of life. CKRI leaders knew that in order to achieve these goals they needed to create a multidisciplinary, collaborative care model that focused on the whole person—one that looked beyond the medical to address vocational, social, and emotional needs.

This two-hour session will cover CKRI’s journey in developing an innovative care management model that used analytics to improve and measure patient and financial outcomes in a value-based, at-risk environment.

HAS 16 Closing Remarks

Dan Burton (Chief Executive Officer, Health Catalyst)

Analytics Walkabout

32 Stations with Multiple Presenters (From Health Systems Across the Country)

The Analytics Walkabout was first introduced last year and is back by popular demand for HAS 16. This year’s experience will consist of 32 different analytics-driven projects featured at individual stations.

Attendees will be able to talk to front-line leaders at each station twice during HAS 16 . The first Analytics Walkabout session will be during the Tuesday evening registration reception starting at 6:00 p.m. The second AW session will be during the Wednesday morning breakfast session prior to the opening of the general opening session. These Analytics Walkabout stations are intended to be 10 minute sessions where you can quickly learn about analytics-related projects across a wide variety of clinical, financial, technical and leadership topics. Outcomes improvement often consists of a multitude of smaller, agile projects. We want to provide a wide variety of different projects, tailored for many different team member roles and types. Our intent is to provide something for everyone.

The following is a list of stations and projects that are under development with more to come.

  • ACO measures
  • Antibiotic usage
  • Bowel surgery
  • Cardiovascular (3-4)
  • Community care
  • Co-locating EMRs
  • Cost accounting
  • Faster time to reporting
  • Glycemic control
  • Identifying research cohorts
  • Imaging operations and overreads
  • Improvement methodology
  • Length of stay (3)
  • Sepsis (3)
  • ROI
  • Infectious disease
  • Patient access
  • Practice management
  • Practice variance
  • Professional billing
  • Readmissions
  • Reducing denials claims
  • Reducing discharge times
  • Reducing ED admissions
  • Revenue cycle
  • Registries
  • Supply chain variation and procurement

View more details

READ WHAT ATTENDEES HAD TO SAY ABOUT HAS 15

  • “I’ve been to a lot of conferences and it’s really easy to go halfway on a conference. And the attention to detail that’s been spent here to make the sessions valuable and lively has been unparalleled. It’s very rich and spectacularly well done.”

  • “What I really like about this is how they have brought in folks from other industries. There is a tremendous amount that we can learn in healthcare from those industries because they have gone there before. And it’s important for us to expand in our minds as we look for new solutions for healthcare”

  • “One of the exciting things for me as a clinician about attending a conference like this is that it doesn’t put analytics at a distance. It doesn’t make it regulatory. It doesn’t make it purely academic in nature. It makes it practical. It really is about how to improve outcomes. And so that’s very powerful.”

  • “We’re now thinking that perhaps we need to transform healthcare to be much more inclusive of the individuals themselves. And we understand the need for data and our ability to interrogate data much more than we ever did. The future of healthcare all over the world is the same: we’re all in trouble because the models we have that fit the 20th century don’t quite fit the 21st. This is the future.”

  • “And for everyone, if you are even remotely interested in analytics, make it a point to get to this conference.”

    John Moore, Chilmark Research

  • "We had folks from our organization at last year’s conference, and they convinced me that I needed to come. Now my job is convince other people that they need to come next year."